Dr Philippe Georgel - University of Strasbourg

Dr Philippe Georgel - University of Strasbourg

Location: 
Davis Auditorium
Start Time: 
Fri, 23/08/2019 - 12:00pm
End Time: 
Fri, 23/08/2019 - 1:00pm

​Urate Crystal-induced inflammation: more than just NLRP3

​Special seminar hosted by Dr Philippe Bouillet

The role of Monosodium Urate (MSU) crystals in gout pathophysiology is well described, as is the major impact of IL-1b in the inflammatory reaction that constitutes the hallmark of the disease. However, despite the discovery of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its role as a Pattern Recognition Receptor linking the detection of a danger signal (MSU) to IL-1b secretion in vitro, the precise mechanisms leading to joint inflammation in gout patients are still poorly understood. Philippe will describe a new model of acute uratic inflammation mouse model which accurately mimics human gout. His work reveals several key features of MSU-dependent inflammation and identifies promising therapeutic opportunities, among which the use of topical application of imiquimod, to promote interferon-dependent anti-inflammatory action.
 
Philippe did his PhD in the Laboratory directed by Professor Pierre Chambon on the influence of chromatin structure on the expression of steroid hormone-dependent genes in Drosophila. In 1992, he moved to the laboratory of Professor Jules Hoffmann, where he was involved in the genetic analysis of the antibacterial response in Drosophila. His main achievement was the identification of the immune deficiency (imd) gene, a homologue of a TNF-a Receptor Interacting Protein in mammals. In 2002, he joined Professor Bruce Beutler’s lab at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla. There, he initiated a screen designed to identify mouse mutants that were hypersusceptible to MCMV infections, which enabled the identification of TLR9 as an essential sensor of Herpesvirus infections. His work was also essential to define the bifid pathway downstream of TLR4, one leading to NF-kB activation and the other to IRF-dependent signaling and type I interferon production. In 2005, he joined Professor Seiamak Bahram to create an INSERM Unit devoted to molecular immune-rheumatology in Strasbourg. His interests are now centered on the mechanisms controlling inflammation. His laboratory investigated the role of Dicer and the functions of pDCs and type I Interferons in Rheumatoid arthritis. He is now working on the role of inflammasomes and interferons in a mouse model gout.